Archive for the ‘Joe Alleva’ Category

Higher Ed Salaries Detailed

06/01/2015

LSU, Southern and UL systems had a $1.2 billion payroll during 2014-15 academic year: See who earned the money

By Quincy Hodges, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

Louisiana’s public higher education institutions spent more than $1.2 billion for salaries in the 2014-15 fiscal year, according to information obtained from Louisiana Board of Regents.

The LSU System, which has nine entities, employed more than 13,000 employees and paid them more than $714 million this fiscal year. Among its top earners were LSU President and Chancellor F. King Alexander at $600,000, athletic director Joe Alleva ($525,000), assistant football coaches, Cam Cameron, Robert Steele and Frank Wilson, all of whom earned $500,000. Steven Heymsfield, the highest paid professor within the LSU system, earned $416,000.

The University of Louisiana system, which includes nine campuses, employed more than 11,000 employees, paying them more than $448 million during this fiscal year.

UL System President Sandra Woodley was the top earner, bringing in $$375,000, followed by University of Louisiana-Lafayette President Ernest Savoie ($360,000) Louisiana Tech University President Leslie Guice ($350,000) and UNO President Peter Fos ($325,000).

The Southern University System employed more than 2,000 employees and had an annual payroll of $84.4 million. Ron Mason, SU’s system president earned $374,000, the highest paid employee in the system. Southern University Law Center Chancellor Freddie Pitcher was the second highest paid employee, bringing in $224,000. Roman Banks, SU’s head football coach and interim athletic director, earned $205,000.


How much do LSU employees make? Search the online database


How much do UL system employees make? Search the online database

How much do Southern University employees make?: Search the online database

Durham, NC District Atty Removed From Office

03/02/2012

Cline permanently removed from Durham DA office

Tracey Cline was immediately and permanently removed from her office as the elected district attorney in Durham by a judge who found she had made statements with malice and reckless disregard for the truth against chief Durham Superior Court Judge Orlando Hudson.

Judge Robert H. Hobgood found that Cline’s conduct in court filings was “prejudicial to the administration of justice” which brought her office into “disrepute.”

Under state law, any DA whose behavior violates that standard shall be removed from office.

Cline is the second consecutive elected DA in Durham to leave mid-term. Former DA Mike Nifong was stripped of his law license in 2007 over ethics violations committed while seeking to prosecute false accusations that three Duke lacrosse players had raped a woman. Cline had been Nifong’s chief assistant.

See here the judge’s order.

Alleva – Then and Now

02/05/2012

Louisiana State University (LSU) Athletic Director Joe Alleva said this six years ago, March 28, 2006:

Statement by Athletics Director Joe Alleva Responding to Student Request to Suspend Season

Durham, N.C. – I completely agree with President Brodhead’s statement and appreciate his leadership throughout this trying situation. As unsettling as this has been for our entire community, dealing with difficult circumstances is part of the educational process. In a meeting this morning, our student-athletes made it clear to us that their behavior was inappropriate and recommended the suspension of their own season until the legal process is complete. Both President Brodhead and I agreed with them. Quite simply, it would not be in the best interest of the student-athletes, the coaches, or our entire University community to continue competition given the seriousness of the allegations. The Duke University Department of Athletics has always attempted to maintain the highest standards on and off the playing fields, and we will continue to do so as we move beyond the uncertainty in this current situation involving our lacrosse program.

Now he’s changed stories:

PLAINTIFFS’ RESPONSE TO THE DUKE DEFENDANTS’ ALLEGATIONS CONCERNING COUNT 21

Further proof of Duke’s media strategy has recently been established in former Athletic Director Joe Alleva’s sworn testimony. During his deposition on January 20, 2012, Mr. Alleva testified that he made positive and truthful statements about Plaintiffs and their teammates’ character at the University’s press conference on March 28, 2006. Mr. Alleva testified that he was “crucified” immediately afterwards for making those statements by President Brodhead himself and in front of the Crisis Management Team, all of whom knew how “off-message” Mr. Alleva’s truthful, positive statements about Plaintiffs were.

The question now is why did Alleva wait six (6) years to speak out? Why didn’t he speak up in March of 2006 and put a stop to the attempted lynching of his student athletes?

LSU AD Alleva Deposed in Duke Lacrosse Suit

02/04/2012

Louisiana State University (LSU) Athletic Director Joe Alleva was deposed last month in a lawsuit filed nearly five years ago regarding the notorious Duke Lacrosse Case, where a prostitute falsely accused three Duke University lacrosse players of rape.

Alleva was Duke’s athletic director at the time and was famously quoted as telling lacrosse coach Mike Pressler as he was cancelling the team’s season that “It’s not about the truth anymore,” because of the intense media coverage of the controversy.

Mike Nifong, the district attorney who filed the bogus charges was later disbarred and spent a night in jail for his role in the attempted lynching.

From the latest filing in McFadyen v Duke:

During his deposition on January 20, 2012, Mr. Alleva testified that he made positive and truthful statements about Plaintiffs and their teammates’ character at the University’s press conference on March 28, 2006.

See here the court filing.

See here earlier coverage of Joe Alleva at Lincoln Parish News Online (LPNO).

Archive for the ‘Joe Alleva’ Category

As soon as we get a copy of the deposition, we will post it.

Higher Ed Roundup – 10/7/11

10/07/2011

Southern University financial woes linger

Southern University chancellor shuffles leadership

The C-Section: University can’t dodge cuts, eliminating swine farm bad for all

Letter: Coach rewarded violation of a rule

Letter: Player should have earned privilege

Letter: Miles misunderstood fans’ booing

Higher Ed Roundup – 9/10/11

09/10/2011

Southern expected to begin layoffs

Reports: LSU Players deny fight

Richters named as ULM executive vice president

Higher Ed Roundup – 9/9/11

09/09/2011

LSU to combine schools into much larger college

LSU Faculty Senate supports new organized labor union

LSU Athletes want search info

Six colleges, programs to merge

Faculty Senate approves unionizing, new commencement gowns

University purchases land to expand South Campus

More on Alleva

09/02/2011

From Durham-in-Wonderland – Comments and analysis about the Duke/Nifong case

Friday, September 02, 2011

A few items from the last week serve as reminders of the lacrosse case.

First, a teaser from yesterday’s N&O front page, highlighting an article to appear Sunday (that I’ll blog) on Mike Nifong’s ethically-challenged successor, Tracey Cline.

Second, college football fans might have read about the arrests of two of LSU players (including the starting quarterback) for assault. LSU’s current athletic director is former Duke AD Joe Alleva—who demonstrated a rather uneven record in the lacrosse case: he shifted from initial public support for the lacrosse players to sudden silence, even as faculty members starting publicly going after student-athletes. All the while, he remained on the job despite being involved in a boating accident that resulted in alcohol-related charges against his son, before moving onto LSU at a higher salary.

Alleva’s comment on the football players’ travails? According to the Times-Picayune, “For his part, Alleva said the current problems facing the football team are “frustrating,” but added that he understands how to handle delicate off-the-field issues from his experience around an alleged 2006 Duke lacrosse rape case that sparked controversy during his time as athletic director at the school.

“There’s a lot of similarities in this situation,” said Alleva, who has been at LSU since 2007. “I think it’s always disappointing when student-athletes don’t behave the way they’re expected to.”

A “lot of similarities” exist between the situations? Really? In the LSU case, no one appears to be denying that a fight occurred and that people were injured, though the players’ attorney has stated that his clients are innocent. (The lawyer has been careful not to deny that the players participated in a fight.) In the Duke case, on the other hand, the players’ attorneys consistently said that no crime occurred, and no physical evidence existed of any injury.

In the LSU case, the prosecutor and police appear to have behaved ethically—and, indeed, seem to have bent over backwards to ensure cooperation with the players. In the Duke case, on the other hand, both the prosecutor and the police cast legal ethics aside in an attempt to obtain convictions.

In the LSU case, there’s no evidence of race/class/gender-oriented faculty exploiting the situation to advance their pedagogical agendas (perhaps because one of the accused is a non-wealthy African-American, albeit one who owns no fewer than 49 pairs of shoes). In the Duke case, on the other hand, activist professors aggressively exploited the case, initially relying solely on the version of events presented by Mike Nifong—though most, in the 2007 clarifying statement, reaffirmed their rush to judgment even after Nifong’s case imploded.

In the LSU case, the accused players appear to have acted well outside the norm for LSU students (most LSU students, it would seem, don’t engage in bar fights). In the Duke case, on the other hand, the lacrosse players—along with hundreds of other Duke students, and thousands of students nationally—attended a tasteless spring break party; and—along with nearly 20 Duke groups over the course of the 2005-6 academic year, including some athletic parties—hired strippers.

Well, one similarity exists between LSU and Duke: Joe Alleva was the AD in both situations.

Higher Ed Roundup – 8/27/11

08/27/2011

Southern University board delays exigency vote

Board approves amended contracts

LSU’s Jefferson, Johns arrested in fight case

LSU players suspended

Jordan Jefferson’s felony arrest rocks LSU football program

LSU System approves $7.9 million for University

Alleva Lies

08/26/2011

From The (New Orleans) Times-Picayune:

LSU Board of Supervisors approves new deals for Les Miles, Joe Alleva

For his part, Alleva said the current problems facing the football team are “frustrating,” but added that he understands how to handle delicate off-the-field issues from his experience around an alleged 2006 Duke lacrosse rape case that sparked controversy during his time as athletic director at the school.

“There’s a lot of similarities in this situation,” said Alleva, who has been at LSU since 2007. “I think it’s always disappointing when student-athletes don’t behave the way they’re expected to.”

This, from the lying bastard who was in the big, fat middle of the lynch mob at Duke in the spring of ’06.

It’s all documented here.

It’s Not About the Truth: The Untold Story of the Duke Lacrosse Rape Case and the Lives It Shattered – by Don Yaeger and Mike Pressler

And the LSU Board of Supervisors gives him a raise. Only in Louisiana.