The Forgotten Man – William Graham Sumner

He works, he votes, generally he prays – but he always pays – yes, above all, he pays. He does not want an office; his name never gets into the newspaper except when he gets married or dies. He keeps production going on. He contributes to the strength of parties. He is flattered before election. He is strongly patriotic. He is wanted, whenever, in his little circle, there is work to be done or counsel to be given. He may grumble some occasionally to his wife and family, but he does not frequent the grocery or talk politics at the tavern.

Consequently, he is forgotten. He is a commonplace man.

He gives no trouble. He excites no admiration. He is not in any way a hero (like a popular orator); or a problem (like tramps and outcasts); nor notorious (like criminals); nor an object of sentiment (like the poor and weak); nor a burden (like paupers and loafers); nor an object out of which social capital may be made (like the beneficiaries of church and state charities); nor an object for charitable aid and protection (like animals treated with cruelty); nor the object of a job (like the ignorant and illiterate); nor one over whom sentimental economists and statesmen can parade their fine sentiments (like inefficient workmen and shiftless artisans).

Therefore, he is forgotten. All the burdens fall on him, or on her, for it is time to remember that the Forgotten Man is not seldom a woman.

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2 Responses to “The Forgotten Man – William Graham Sumner”

  1. Oldman Says:

    How so true,for gotten until they need something. Also how true when they want somebody to place the blame on when they screw up. The for gotten man is in big demand when taxes need to be raised.

  2. ThrowMeSomethin'Mister Says:

    Excellent!!

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